Trees for Honolulu's Future
Trees for Honolulu's Future

Key Takeaways from Landscape Architects

Organize cities through Landscape

Existing settlement patterns and grids can be changed to better fit underlying ecology.  Landscapes are dynamic, self-regulating, accrue over time, are inhabited, and connect everything.  Different types of plant communities - self-sustaining natural remnant patches, heavily maintained landscapes, and ruderal “leftover scraps” - all provide benefits and provide a fit for varied soil quality.” 

-Simon Bussiere, ASLA

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HHF Planners
Biodiversity in Urban Design

Why do we get stuck on monocultures and the same old plants?  Uniformity creates sense of identity, the plants are available, the plants fit City maintenance requirements and limit liability from dropping fruit or seeds. However, the lack of variety and genetic diversity makes the urban forest vulnerable to disease, pests and climate change, and also fails to celebrate our unique native plants.”

-Richard Quinn, ASLA, LEED AP

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HHF Planners
Plan with Existing Trees in Mind

“Large existing trees should be considered and worked into the design to:  buffer scale of large buildings, add shade, provide character or context, frame views, and create instant impact. Then, fill in with new trees."

-Dawn Easterday, ASLA, RLA, LEED BD+C, GRP

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HHF Planners